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Tuesday, 14 September 2021 00:00

Reduced blood flow in the lower limbs can be a common problem as you get older. If you have poor circulation in your feet and ankles, exercising regularly may help. There are a variety of exercises that are tailored to your specific needs and abilities that you can do. Taking regular walks is just one low-cost way to get moving. You can also exercise your legs with stretches while laying down, sitting, or standing. If you sit at a desk for work, you might incorporate some quick heel and toe raises. To do this exercise, sit with both feet flat on the floor in front of you. Raise both of your heels and hold for three seconds. Repeat this 10 times. Next, raise just your toes and hold for three seconds. Repeat 10 times. For more information on how to increase lower limb circulation, please consult with a podiatrist. 

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. John Branwell of Kearny, New Jersey. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kearny, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Causes Symptoms and Treatment for Poor Circulation in the Feet
Tuesday, 07 September 2021 00:00

Heel spurs are bony growths that can develop on the heels, usually due to small, repetitive traumas to the area. Heel spurs may develop from exercising, wearing poorly-fitted shoes, carrying excess body weight, or having an abnormal gait or arthritis. Heel spurs typically occur in one of two areas. Heel spurs that form on the back of the heel are associated with Achilles tendon inflammation. Heel spurs that form on the underside of the heel are associated with plantar fasciitis. In some cases heel spurs cause no symptoms and are only detected incidentally during X-rays. In other cases, heel spurs can cause pain, swelling, and tenderness. If you are experiencing any heel pain, please seek the care of a podiatrist. 

Heel spurs can be incredibly painful and sometimes may make you unable to participate in physical activities. To get medical care for your heel spurs, contact Dr. John Branwell from Kearny, New Jersey. Our doctor will do everything possible to treat your condition.

Heels Spurs

Heel spurs are formed by calcium deposits on the back of the foot where the heel is. This can also be caused by small fragments of bone breaking off one section of the foot, attaching onto the back of the foot. Heel spurs can also be bone growth on the back of the foot and may grow in the direction of the arch of the foot.

Older individuals usually suffer from heel spurs and pain sometimes intensifies with age. One of the main condition's spurs are related to is plantar fasciitis.

Pain

The pain associated with spurs is often because of weight placed on the feet. When someone is walking, their entire weight is concentrated on the feet. Bone spurs then have the tendency to affect other bones and tissues around the foot. As the pain continues, the feet will become tender and sensitive over time.

Treatments

There are many ways to treat heel spurs. If one is suffering from heel spurs in conjunction with pain, there are several methods for healing. Medication, surgery, and herbal care are some options.

If you have any questions feel free to contact our office located in Kearny, NJ . We offer the latest in diagnostic and treatment technology to meet your needs.

Read more about Heel Spurs
Tuesday, 31 August 2021 00:00

Foot ulcers are red, crater-like wounds—often bordered by callused skin—that typically occur on the soles and sides of the feet. They sometimes can form on the tips or tops of the toes as well. Foot ulcers can range from shallow, surface lesions to wounds deep enough to expose tendons, ligaments, and even bones. Foot ulcers can be a common occurrence in people with diabetes, and the associated condition of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral artery disease— making them difficult to feel, detect, and heal. Other circulation disorders such as atherosclerosis and Raynaud's phenomenon increase the risk of foot ulcers developing. People with these conditions should examine their feet daily and get professional wound care if they spot something irregular. A podiatrist can provide proper treatment for a foot ulcer to help avoid infection. If you believe you may have a foot ulcer, seek the care of a podiatrist.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Dr. John Branwell from Kearny, New Jersey. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Kearny, NJ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Wound Care
Wednesday, 25 August 2021 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

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